A.G. HUNTSMAN AWARD

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EDWARD DELONG (2014)

Dr. Edward DeLong received his Bachelor of Science degree in Bacteriology at the University of California Davis, and his Ph.D. in Marine Biology at Scripps Institute of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. He was a Professor at the University of California Santa Barbara in the Department of Ecology for seven years, before moving to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute where he was a Senior Scientist and Chair of the Science Department also for seven years. Until July 2014, he served as a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Departments of Civil and Environmental, and Biological Engineering, where he held the Morton and Claire Goulder Family Professorship in Environmental Systems. He is now a Professor of Oceanography in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. He currently serves as co-Director for both the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), and the Simons Collaboration on Ocean Processes and Ecology (SCOPE). DeLong is a Fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Academy of Arts and Science, the U. S. National Academy of Science, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

DeLong’s scientific interests focus primarily on central questions in marine microbial genomics, biogeochemistry, ecology, and evolution. A large part of DeLong’s efforts have been devoted to the study of microbes and microbial processes in the ocean, combining laboratory and field-based approaches. Development and application of genomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches to study and exploit microbial communities and processes is another area of interest.Currently, Delong is coupling the use of autonomous robotic sensors and samplers with genomic technologies, to derive highly resolution spatial and temporal maps of microbial community gene expression datasets in situ.